Monday, October 23, 2006

In Bed With Thieves and Murderers

By Cassandra D

...and that's putting it mildly.

If you didn't catch last night's "60 Minutes," there are some gut-wrenching segments worth seeing.

First you can watch a report on the U.S. Coalition Provisional Authority's having been so enamored of an exiled Iraqi who ran a pizza business and could speak English that they put him in charge of buying $1.2 billion in military equipment for the Iraqi Army. $800 million is missing, showing up here and there outside Iraq in the form of mansions and who-knows-what else, while the Iraqi Army got defective and old equipment. And the U.S. doesn't want to look stupid, so isn't helping nab the crooks, many of whom are or were in the Iraqi government.

Then you can hear about how our government is talking the talk but not walking the walk on the genocide in Darfur, in part because the government in Sudan once hosted Osama bin Laden and now gives us little tidbits of information about al Qaeda.

Both stories are sobering and frustrating. The first shows again the maddening incompetence and lack of oversight that have become so familiar to us all, and the second shows just how silent the we and the rest of the world have been in the face of repeating evil and terrible misery. Are we looking the other way while women are gang raped and entire villages murdered because we want the help of the genocidal murderers? Are we turning a blind eye in the pitiful hope that it will somehow ensure our own safety?

4 Comments:

At 12:05 PM, Blogger Dr. Pants said...

Accountability is a dirty word, isn't it?

I mean, that's got to be why nobody ever does anything with this sort of information. I use it, of course, to furiously masturbate to, but most people say, "That's too bad" and then go about their business re-electing the same people.

It must be nice to have such a simple decision, though. You can block out EVERYTHING else and just say, "Is he going to raise my taxes?" or "Will she approve of abortion in any case?" and vote accordingly.

 
At 11:42 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Cassandra, those last few lines of your post sound like a case for invading Iraq....

"Are we looking the other way while women are gang raped and entire villages murdered because we want the help of the genocidal murderers? Are we turning a blind eye in the pitiful hope that it will somehow ensure our own safety?"

I mean wasn't that part of the rationale for why we reversed course after years of dealing with Saddam and then "containing" him after we'd created the problem in the first place?

We can't be the world's globocops -- it didn't work in Iraq, as we're repeatedly reminded. Better for us not be involved, and what about collateral damage? Can you honestly say that if we did something we wouldn't kill innocents in the process? They'll just have to work it out on their own. Genocide is going to be this century's regular occurrence. America can't stop it; it just makes people hate us more. The Sudanese government is going to win, anyway.

 
At 7:25 AM, Blogger Chase McInerney said...

Anonymous -
That's an awfully naive viewpoint on why we invaded Iraq. That wasn't about being the world's globocops.

That was about fulfilling a war that an administration had preordained - and not because of Saddam's atrocities (God knows the U.S. routinely allows that in dictatorships friendly to us), but because of phantom WMDs (oh, and the belief that Saddam was the loose thread from Bush Sr.'s presidency).

 
At 8:00 AM, Blogger LiteraryTech said...

It is always about money and power, Cassandra. We aren't helping Darfur because it doesn't provide money or power. In fact, leaving the Sudanese government in place might give us information about Al Quaeda and that is useful for aggregating power through the mongering of fear.

And I have to agree with Chase. The war of aggression in Iraq was not to put out a bad man. We like bad men. We routinely overthrow democratically elected governments to install bad men. If we are to posit any rationale that fits the facts, we must conclude that the war in Iraq was prosecuted to satisfy the ambitions of the powerful in their quest to aggregate more power and the money that makes power possible.

 

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